vaccinations

APPOINTMENT

Canine Vaccines

 
Vaccines are now being divided into two classes. ‘Core’ vaccines for dogs are those that should be given to every dog. ‘Noncore’ vaccines are recommended only for certain dogs. Whether to vaccinate with noncore vaccines depends upon a number of things including the age, breed, and health status of the dog, the potential exposure of the dog to an animal that has the disease, the type of vaccine and how common the disease is in the geographical area where the dog lives or may visit.

The American Animal Hospital Association 2017 Vaccination Guidelines has recommended that the core vaccines for dogs: distemper, canine adenovirus, canine parvovirus, and rabies be given every 3 years after the first yearly booster.

The Noncore vaccines; leptospirosis, coronavirus, canine parainfluenza and Bordetella bronchiseptica (both are causes of ‘kennel cough’), and Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme Disease) should be given yearly based on the lifestyle of your dog. We will be happy to consult with you help you select the proper vaccines for your dog or puppy.

Our Canine Vaccine Protocol:
· 8 weeks: DA2P + Intranasal Bordetella, Parainfuenza, Canine Adenovirus Type 2
· 12 weeks: DA2PP + Leptospirosis
· 16 weeks: DA2PP + Leptospirosis + Rabies

 

Feline Vaccines

 
Experts generally agree on what vaccines are ‘core’ vaccines for cats, i.e., what vaccines should be given to every cat, and what vaccines are given only to certain cats (noncore). Whether to vaccinate with noncore vaccines depends upon a number of things including the age, breed, and health status of the cat, the potential exposure of the cat to an animal that has the disease, the type of vaccine, and how common the disease is in the geographical area where the cat lives or may visit.

In cats, the suggested core vaccines are feline panleukopenia (distemper), feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and rabies.

The non-core vaccines include the feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and Chlamydia psittaci. The AAFP recommends AGAINST FeLV vaccinations in adult totally indoor cats who have no exposure to other cats. It is suggested that all kittens because they are most susceptible and their lifestyles may change, should receive an initial FeLV vaccination series. The choice to use a Chlamydia vaccine is based upon the prevalence of the disease and husbandry conditions, however, we do not carry the Chlamydia vaccine.

Modified live virus (MLV) and recombinant vaccines are preferred for cats over the killed adjuvant vaccines as they reduce the risk of an adverse vaccine reaction. When comparing the cost of vaccinations between other veterinary clinics it is important to ask what vaccines are being given to your cat. The recombinant one and three-year Rabies vaccine and one-year Feline Leukemia vaccine are more costly but safer for your cat. We only use the recombinant Rabies and Leukemia vaccine for our feline patients and as a result, our vaccination costs may be more expensive than other veterinary clinics.

Our Feline Vaccine Protocol:
· 8 weeks: FVRCP
· 12 weeks: FVRCP + Leukemia
· 16 weeks: FVRCP + Leukemia + Rabies

FOR MORE DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT VACCINES AND VACCINATION GUIDELINES CLICK HERE.

No question is too big or too small.

If you have a question our contact information is below. We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you soon.

address

1465 Trussler Rd.

Kitchener, ON N2R 1S7

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hours

MON to FRI: 8am - 6pm
SATURDAY: 8am - 12pm
SUNDAY: Closed

*Closed on Saturdays during holiday weekends.

phone numbers

Phone: 519-696-3102
After Hours: 519-650-1617

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